Soft.Spoken.Madness.

"Out in the garden where we planted the seeds
There is a tree as old as me
Branches were sewn by the color of green
Ground had arose and passed it's knees
By the cracks of the skin I climbed to the top
I climbed the tree to see the world." -TCO

distortus:

In Chinese mythology and culture, the three-legged crow is called the Sanzuwu and is responsible for the sun’s passage across the sky. The earliest known depiction of a three-legged crow appears in Neolithic pottery of the Yangzhou culture. The Sanzuwu is used in the decoration of formal imperial silk garments of the Western Han Dynasty 202 BC -220 AD depicts a Sanzuwu perched on a tree.In Japanese mythology, this flying creature is a raven or a Jungle Crow called Yatagarasu and the appearance of the great bird is interpreted as evidence of the will of Heaven or divine intervention in human affairs. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu (reigned 18 February 660 BC - 9 April 585 BC) on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano. In Korean mythology, it is known as Samjok-o. During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom 37 BCE–668 CE, the Samjok-o was a highly regarded emblem of power, thought greater than both the dragon and the Korean phoenix.Raven is the great shape shifter. The three legs symbolize Heaven, Earth and Humanity. It is one of the most universally ancient images of raven, appearing in the China, Japan, Korea, Neolithic site of Newgrange, Celtic art, Scandinavian art, Ancient Italian art, Egyptian art, and cultures throughout Africa.

distortus:

In Chinese mythology and culture, the three-legged crow is called the Sanzuwu and is responsible for the sun’s passage across the sky. The earliest known depiction of a three-legged crow appears in Neolithic pottery of the Yangzhou culture. The Sanzuwu is used in the decoration of formal imperial silk garments of the Western Han Dynasty 202 BC -220 AD depicts a Sanzuwu perched on a tree.

In Japanese mythology, this flying creature is a raven or a Jungle Crow called Yatagarasu and the appearance of the great bird is interpreted as evidence of the will of Heaven or divine intervention in human affairs. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu (reigned 18 February 660 BC - 9 April 585 BC) on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano. 

In Korean mythology, it is known as Samjok-o. During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom 37 BCE–668 CE, the Samjok-o was a highly regarded emblem of power, thought greater than both the dragon and the Korean phoenix.

Raven is the great shape shifter. The three legs symbolize Heaven, Earth and Humanity. It is one of the most universally ancient images of raven, appearing in the China, Japan, Korea, Neolithic site of Newgrange, Celtic art, Scandinavian art, Ancient Italian art, Egyptian art, and cultures throughout Africa.

(via androidghost)

Another steal from George Takei’s Facebook.
Bouquet.

There’s so many.

Ever stop to think to, “There’s so many people in the world.” Trying to fathom it. Grasp the very thought.

Does it make you feel claustrophobic? Does it make you want to scream?

I feel the anxiety crawl up to my throat from my abdomen.

Does it make you want to have children? Does it make you want to wonder if you will have enough food to eat in the next 20 years? Maybe, even less?

I don’t want to fear the future. I want to appreciate right now how thankful I am for having the necessities to survive and still enjoy the simple pleasures in life.

Earth Day is EVERYDAY!

Earth Day is EVERYDAY!

bitchville:

Earth and Art by http://www.theinksociety.com/